Alexander Adams – On Dead Mountain

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On Dead Mountain

Alexander Adams, On Dead Mountain, Golconda Fine Art Books UK, publ. 30 September 2015, English text with translation into Russian by Viktoria Grivina, paperback, 64pp, 11 illus. by the author incl. 2 fold-out pages, size 21 x 15 cm, £10, ISBN: 978-0-9550843-8-6

Cover text: “In 1959 a group of Soviet students went on a skiing expedition in the Ural Mountains. Months later their bodies were discovered in the snow. Their deaths have never been satisfactorily explained. In Alexander Adams’s long poem, the last adventure of the team is considered symbolically as a journey from life to death with universal relevance. Illustrated by the author, the poem evokes the adventurers’ camaraderie, foreshadows their haunting fate and meditates upon the nature of grief.”

В 1959 году группа советских студентов отправилась в экспедицию на лыжах по Уральским горам. Несколькими месяцами спустя их тела были обнаружены в снегах. Обстоятельства их смерти не были выяснены. В поэме Александра Адамса последний поход команды представлен как универсальный символ перехода от жизни к смерти. Поэма, дополненная иллюстрациями автора, показывает товарищеский дух группы, отражает предчувствие неизбежной судьбы и размышления о природе скорби.

This book is intended to be a work of art in itself, with the text, design and images working together to create a powerful impression. It is hoped that the proximity of the Russian text will make English readers feel closer to the language of the Dyatlov party and more immersed in the world. The author had control over every aspect of the design and production of this book.

Technical: Designed by Aquarium Graphic Design and printed in a first British edition of 1,000 PB copies, published by Golconda Fine Art Books UK. No HB or foreign edition currently planned. Signature/section sewn, stiff card covers, squared spine with lettering, Olin off-white paper, 11 illus., 2 fold-outs, marginal line numbering.  Size: 21 x 15 cm. Contents: dedication, introduction, poem (EN original text), poem (RU translated text), glossary/endnotes, translator’s note, bios for author & translator, acknowledgements & colophon. All text in EN and RU.

Order copies: The book is available worldwide via http://www.amazon.com

ODM in public collections: British Library (London), Tate Gallery (London), Goldsmiths College (London), Arizona University Poetry Center (Tucson), Newberry Library (Chicago), Oxford Brookes University (artist’s book collection), Bodleian Library (Oxford), Falmouth University (Cornwall), National Museum of Wales (Cardiff)

Reading tour (to be updated periodically): Launch, Poetry Cafe, London, 15 October 2015

Nov.: Club der polnischen Versager, Ackerstr. 168, 10115 Berlin (U8 Rosenthaler Pl.), 18 November 2015, 19:00-22:00 (reading at 20:00, approx. 40 min), free entry, no tickets, no reservations, early arrival recommended

Urban Coffee, Fargo Village, Far Gosford Street, Coventry, 29 November 2015, 15:00-16:00

April: New York City, USA

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Dyatlov Pass Mystery: Solved?

“It starts out like a horror movie. Deep in the mid-winter of 1958/59, a low-ranking army officer in a remote region of the USSR receives a phone call informing him that a group of hikers has failed to return from an expedition. He is asked to lead a search. His team arrives by helicopter on the exposed slopes of Otorten Mountain (Dead Mountain) and eventually discover a tent partially covered in snow. It is empty. Apart from a rip in the side of the tent, nothing looks disturbed or unusual. Most of the group’s clothing and all of its outdoor gear is there. In that barren environment, with the nearest dwelling miles away, what reason could the hikers have had to leave the protection and warmth of their shelter? The searchers discern tracks of nine people going away from the tent and none returning. They follow the tracks and soon find the first bodies.

“The missing group of hikers were university students from Sverdlovsk, central Russia. Hiking and skiing was a popular recreation in mid-century USSR, enjoyed by members of all professions and both sexes on an equal basis. In January 1959, a team of seven men and two women, all aged between 20 and 24, set out on an ambitious trek in the sparsely populated Ural Mountains. They were led by an experienced hiker and skier, Igor Dyatlov. All had experience of climbing, hiking and snow travel. The team members knew each other well and had previously undertaken expeditions together. They were well equipped and planned their route in advance.

“When they arrived in the region, they met an older hiker who asked to tag along. He was an army veteran who had planned to ski in the area and had found he could not coordinate with his own group. The students agreed to let him join them. Just before the final leg of the expedition, Yuri Yudin had to withdraw due to a painful attack of rheumatism. He decided to return and said goodbye to his nine companions. Yudin was the only member of the party to survive…”

Read the full review on SPIKED, 10 April 2015 here: http://www.spiked-online.com/review_of_books/article/dyatlov-pass-a-chilling-mystery-solved/16853#.Vd-RlPldU5k

The Franklin Expedition: A Victorian Era Moon Landing

“In May 1845, two Royal Navy ships, HMS Terror and Erebus, embarked from London on a voyage with ambitious aims. The mission would forge a passage through the partially mapped channels of northern Canada and pioneer the Northwest Passage. This route from Greenland to Alaska via the icy channels on the Arctic Circle would open new trading routes and allow vessels to forgo the dangerous and lengthy passage around Cape Horn. The attempt would use new technology pioneered in Britain – coal-fired engines powering propeller screws for locomotion, and tinned food.

“The Admiralty decided on a large party in two ships under the command of Arctic veteran Sir John Franklin. Hostile conditions, the use of new technology, and – critically – operating beyond immediate assistance of the few trading forts and whaling stations to the south, meant the expedition was the equivalent of a Victorian-era moon landing. If men, supplies, technology, knowhow or leadership failed, then deaths could be expected. However, experience suggested that if the attempt met insurmountable obstacles there was a fair chance of retreating with only minor casualties, if leadership was decisive enough…”

Read the full review on SPIKED, 30 January 2015 here:

http://www.spiked-online.com/review_of_books/article/the-franklin-expedition-a-victorian-era-moon-landing/16565#.Vd-MbvldU5k